Super Qiao Hu Study Guide and French Fluency Recovery Project – Week 48

My Mandarin viewing is back in full throttle. In fact, upon returning from my Peru trip, I believe I set an all-time record for total viewing hours in a seven-day period. I watched nearly 12 hours—an average of 1:40 per day! By contrast, my average daily viewing time for the entire 11 months of the experiment has been just 36 minutes.

I’m happy to report that my daughter Camila Daya also got back into watching Chinese videos with me, especially Boonie Bears, and tallied nearly six hours in the same period. I don’t necessarily expect her renewed enthusiasm to be sustained, but we always have fun and I think the exposure to Mandarin is positive for her on various levels (even if the exposure to the Boonie Bears’ sadistically violent tormenting of Vick the Logger is not morally enlightening).

Here’s a little table summarizing our recent viewing time.

Victor Minutes Daya Minutes
11-Dec-14 108
12-Dec-14 140 80
13-Dec-14 75 75
14-Dec-14 93 52
15-Dec-14 122 42
16-Dec-14 41 101
17-Dec-14 134
Total Hours 11.9 5.8
Avg Minutes 102 50
Experiment Average 36.3 16.3

This week I also spent a significant amount of time preparing a Super Qiao Hu Study Guide. These guides were originally suggested to me (by an administrator at chinese-forums.com) as a way to show my progress and level of understanding to others. They are of course also intended as a helpful tool for other beginning students of Mandarin, and I highly recommend using the episodes I review for learning purposes. Reading through my guides beforehand, and occasionally referencing them, will help students know what to listen for and may also serve as a useful yardstick to measure their own understanding. However, the rules of my experiment and my time constraints impose some limitations on how useful I can make these study guides. For instance, I cannot research terms or include Chinese characters or pin yin.

The original diagnostic purpose of the Qiao Hu reviews still holds. In this respect, I was pleased that in this episode I was able to understand far more phrases and complete sentences than ever before. My improved comprehension is reflected in the length of this Study Guide Seven—four whole pages, instead of the two or three for past guides. I believe looking at each of my seven guides in sequence would provide a fairly clear indication of my progress over time.

I should note, however, that my comprehension of the Qiao Hu episodes, as reflected in the guides, is not the result of a single viewing. I spent at least a couple of hours preparing this latest guide, including watching each scene an average of about four times. In other words, I was able to understand all I did because of very careful listening and repetition of dialogue.

In other news, today I began a brand-new language acquisition project that I will also report on in this blog. I will henceforth spend an average of at least 10 minutes per day studying French—probably most of it on listening, but also including reading, writing, and speaking. Unlike my Mandarin project, my main purpose is not experimental: I simply want to recover my fluency in the language. However, since I am always interested in contributing to the understanding of the language acquisition process, I will carefully record my activities and report on my progress.

I will continue to focus my weekly posts here on my Mandarin experiment, though I may occasionally comment on my new French project en passant. However, I will create specific pages to report on my French project—albeit with much less detail and frequency.

What I did to kick-start my French project today was to devise and take a self-administered test to measure my reading, writing, and speaking ability before getting started. I have detailed the test procedure and posted my actual performance (without any corrections yet) on my new French project pages. I hope you will take a look!

4 thoughts on “Super Qiao Hu Study Guide and French Fluency Recovery Project – Week 48

  1. Greta Browne says:

    You’ve inspired me to spend some time sprucing up my French – at one time I spoke quite fluently. I’ll never chat in Mandarin with you, but peut’etre on pourra causer in français.

  2. What will you do to spruce up your French? It would be fun if you did it as a project, in your own way of course. A vacation in France might be in order in a couple of years!

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